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HS-7954SH High Voltage Ultra Torque Servo

Key Features

  • Li-Po cell compatible
  • Fully programmable digital technology
  • G2 Digital Circuit
  • HV Coreless Motor
  • Dual Ball Bearing Supported Output Shaft
  • Steel Gear Train (MK first gear)

Overview

The HS-7954SH could be considered the most economical high voltage, high torque, coreless servo on the market. Based on the ultra popular HS-7955TG has the added benefit of a high voltage coreless motor. With 403 inch-ounces of torque at 7.4 volts, the is fast too HS-7954SH with a 0.12 second transit time when operating on a 2 cell LiPo pack. The HS-7954SH harnesses all this power is by utilizing a heavy duty case that incorporates an aluminum heat sink, hardened steel gears, two strong steel gear pins nested in brass axial bushings. Put it all together and you get one tough high voltage servo at a price that can't be beat.

Programable Features Include:
- Dead Band Width 
- Direction of Rotation 
- Speed of Rotation (slower) 
- End Points 
- Neutral Points 
- Fail Safe On/Off 
- Fail Safe Point 
- Resolution* (default is high resolution) 
- Overload Protection* (default is off)

*these features are only programable with the HFP-20 field programmer (HRC44430)

Detailed Information

Bearing: Dual
Bushing Or Bearing: Bearing
Deadband: Programmable
Gear Type: Metal
Motor Type: Coreless
Servo Type: Digital
Servo Voltage: 6.0–7.4V (High Voltage)
Speed: 0.15 sec/60 deg @ 6V; 0.12 sec/60 deg @ 7.4V
Torque: 333 oz-in (24.0kg-cm) @ 6V; 403 oz-in (28.8kg-cm) @ 7.4V

Parts Listing

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Optional Accessories

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FAQs

What's the difference between digital and analog servos?

Digital and analog servos have very similar construction and components. They both use the same type of motors, gears, cases, and have a potentiometer. A digital servo is different in the way it processes the incoming signal and converts that signal into servo movement. 

An analog servo when it receives a command to move, takes that signal and sends pulses to the servo motor at about 50 cycles per second, which in turn moves the motor to its required position determined by the potentiometer.

A digital servo has a micro-processor that receives the signal and then adjusts the pulse length and amount of power to the servo motor to achieve optimum servo performance and precision. A digital servo sends these pulses to the motor at a much higher frequency which is around 300 cycles per second. This helps eliminate deadband, provides a faster response to the servo motor, smoother motor movement, and has higher resolution and holding power than an analog servo.

There are some disadvantages to digital servos, but the disadvantages are not in any way close to out weighing the advantages. A digital servo will have a higher power consumption (Around 10 to 15 mAh per servo at idle) than an analog servo due to its higher pulse frequency, so larger capacity battery packs are recommended. Digital servos also are more expensive than analog servos which can get very costly in applications that require many servos.

What grease should I use on my servo gear train?

For JR servos we recommend Tamiya ceramic grease (TAM87025).

Why doesn't my servo center properly?

There are several scenarios which may attribute to this problem. 

1. The servo arm fit on the output spline may be loose.

2. There may be slop or wear in the gear train.

3. There may be slop or binding in the linkages.

4. You may have a faulty servo saver.

5 The push rods may be too flexible.

6. Improperly mounted servo (screws too tight, mounting rail too tight against the servo)

7. Faulty extention, damaged lead or dirty connector.

8. Worn or dirty pot.

Can I use a JR servo with a Futaba receiver?

Yes

Why can't you use the JR 8700G servo with FM?

The frequency on operation is so high that it feeds back with FM receivers.

What's the difference between digital and analog servos?

Digital and analog servos have very similar construction and components. They both use the same type of motors, gears, cases, and have a potentiometer. A digital servo is different in the way it processes the incoming signal and converts that signal into servo movement. 

An analog servo when it receives a command to move, takes that signal and sends pulses to the servo motor at about 50 cycles per second, which in turn moves the motor to its required position determined by the potentiometer.

A digital servo has a micro-processor that receives the signal and then adjusts the pulse length and amount of power to the servo motor to achieve optimum servo performance and precision. A digital servo sends these pulses to the motor at a much higher frequency which is around 300 cycles per second. This helps eliminate deadband, provides a faster response to the servo motor, smoother motor movement, and has higher resolution and holding power than an analog servo.

There are some disadvantages to digital servos, but the disadvantages are not in any way close to out weighing the advantages. A digital servo will have a higher power consumption (Around 10 to 15 mAh per servo at idle) than an analog servo due to its higher pulse frequency, so larger capacity battery packs are recommended. Digital servos also are more expensive than analog servos which can get very costly in applications that require many servos.

What grease should I use on my servo gear train?

For JR servos we recommend Tamiya ceramic grease (TAM87025).

Why doesn't my servo center properly?

There are several scenarios which may attribute to this problem.

1. The servo arm fit on the output spline may be loose.

2. There may be slop or wear in the gear train.

3. There may be slop or binding in the linkages.

4. You may have a faulty servo saver.

5 The push rods may be too flexible.

6. Improperly mounted servo (screws too tight, mounting rail too tight against the servo)

7.Faulty extention, damaged lead or dirty connector.

8. Worn or dirty pot.

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