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AT-6 Texan 60 w/Retracts ARF AT-6 Texan 60 w/Retracts ARF AT-6 Texan 60 w/Retracts ARF AT-6 Texan 60 w/Retracts ARF AT-6 Texan 60 w/Retracts ARF AT-6 Texan 60 w/Retracts ARF AT-6 Texan 60 w/Retracts ARF
  • Overview
  • Specs
  • Reviews
  • Parts & Accessories
  • Completion Guide
  • Manuals & Support

Key Features

  • Outstanding scale appearance
  • Factory installed retracts
  • Gear doors included
  • Mock radial engine included

Overview

This well crafted interpretation of an actual full-scale Texan is perfect for sport aerobactics, club pylon racing or just buzzing around the pattern

Detailed Information

Fred Johnson and his Texan, "Miss Appropriation of Funds".

The advanced trainer of choice for America and her allies during WWII, the T-6 Texan gave hundreds of thousands of pilots their first glimpse of aerial combat maneuvers before they were plunged into actual combat over Europe and the Pacific. A living legend, the Texan still flies today as an air show performer, in air races, and as the prized possession of a lucky few private owners who fly for thrills.

Hangar 9’s one-of-a-kind AT-6 ARF is a skillfully crafted rendition of a full-scale Texan owned by Fred Johnson of Ocala, FL named Miss Appropriation of Funds. This plane has thrilled thousands at the world famous Reno Air Races and currently thrills thousands more at air shows across the country as part of a 3-plane precision aerobatics team. Like its full-scale inspiration, the Hangar 9 Texan is also a stunning performer that is great for sport aerobatics, club pylon racing, or just buzzing around the pattern. Scale details abound, like the factory painted fiberglass cowl, factory installed retracts with gear doors, and even a mock radial engine. The authentic trim scheme is reproduced in painstaking detail using genuine Hangar 9 Ultracote.

No other .60 size Texan ARF offers this level of scale realism and fantastic flight characteristics.

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Flying Weight: 7–8.5 lb (3.17–3.85kg)
Recommended Fuel: Glow
Wingspan: 67.5 in (1714mm)

Parts Listing

$77.99  $62.39
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$11.99  $9.49
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$4.99
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Manuals

FAQs

Product Support Tips

What engine should I choose?

Choose the lightest weight, highest power engine you can find, within the engine recommendations. The Saito 100 is a very good choice for this plane.

What radio system should I choose?

You can use any 5-channel radio system.

What servos should I choose?

Standard servos are more than adequate for the plane. But keep in mind that the better servos you use, the better the plane will fly. You will also need a low profile retract servo.

Can I fly the plane on a 4-channel radio system?

The AT-6 does have pre-installed retracts in the wings, so unless you switch them out to a fixed gear (which requires much modification), or have a way to lock the retracts in the down position, you must have at least a 5-channel system.

How difficult is the AT-6 to fly?

Since the AT-6 is a semi-scale model it has been optimized to fly very well, but it does still have some qualities that make it a plane for relatively advanced pilots. Because of this, a beginner should not fly it! It does land very slowly for a plane of its type, and does perform very well. In the air, the AT-6 flies very smoothly, and has no bad habits.

Section 4: Installing the Aileron Control Horns and Linkages

Step 4
Drilling the 3 parallel holes for the control horn is very difficult and takes some time to get the control horn backing plate onto the screws. Just be patient and drill them the best you can, and if necessary you may need to drill them out a couple times to get them to line up. Some CA in the holes will help keep things secure.

Section 5: Installing the Retract Servo

Step 1
These may require some trial and error to get to fit. Just take your time to make them fit properly.

Step 6

Be sure that the measurement of the wheel is the same as the measurement taken in step 5 to get the proper throw so that each gear will lock in both the up and down positions.
The hardware provided used e-clips to secure the quick connects to the wheel. This took some time to do, but after you get the e-clips into place there are no problems using them.
The retracts did require some set up work to operate correctly as it required some adjustments on the quick connects and a little trial and error, but is not too difficult to complete. Be sure that they lock in both the up and down positions.

Section 6: Installing the Main Landing Gear Wheels and Fairings

Step 9

I added a couple drops of medium CA under the straps so that they hold on more securely to the landing gear leg and to prevent them from rotating.

Section 8: Installing the Tail Group (Horizontal and Vertical Fin)

Step 7

Pay special attention to the cautions in the manual, which mention not pressing hard with the knife when removing the covering from horizontal stabilizer. If it is cut to deep, it will fail.

Step 10

Here again, pay special attention to the cautions in the manual, which mention not pressing hard with the knife when removing the covering from the vertical fin. If it is cut to deep, it will fail.

Step 13

Be sure to place the elevator joiner wire into the fuselage prior to installing the horizontal stabilizer.

Section 9: Hinging the Elevators

Step 2

Be sure to drill the holes for the elevator joiner wire straight through the center of the elvator to prevent damage to the elevator and also to ensure that the elevators will line up correctly with each other later in assembly.

Section 10: Installing the Rudder and Tail Wheel Assembly

Step 3

Drill straight through the center of the rudder to prevent damage to the rudder and so that the tail wheel will line up correctly with the rudder.

Section 11: Installing the Elevator and Rudder Control Horns

Steps 3 and 7

Here again, drilling the 3 parallel holes for the control horn is difficult and takes time to get the control horn backing plate onto the screws. Just be patient and drill them the best you can, and if necessary you may need to drill them out a couple times to get them to line up. Some CA in the holes will help keep things secure.

Section 16: Attaching the Cowl

Step 3

I istalled these blocks 1/16” to 1/8” out from being flush with the fuselage sides. I did this so that the plane would have a more scale appearance, as the cowl diameter is larger than the fuselage. This creates a better scale appearance.

Step 6

Use great care to drill the cowling mounting holes in the proper locations so that you do not miss the mounting blocks. If necessary, tape a piece of paper to the fuse, and mark the location of the blocks with the cowl removed, then install the cowling, then with the paper mark the location to drill the location for the screws. This will help ensure a proper installation without unsightly holes in the cowling.

Control Throws and Center of Gravity

The balance point is 4 ¾" behind the leading edge of the wing, measured at the fuselage. This is the very front of the wing. This kit balanced without any wieght. Move the battery pack around as much as possible to achieve the proper CG withough added weight. Add lead only if necessary. Do not fly the model with an incorrect CG!

Installing the Scale “Antenna”

To install the scale antenna included in the kit, measure forward of of the vertical fin 5 ½" and make a mark on the top center of the turtledeck. Center the bottom of the “antenna” at this point, and draw a line around it with a felt tip pen. You can make a mark at the center of the vertical fin and the rear of the cockpit area/canopy and conect the points to find the true center of the turtledeck. Use a xacto knife or similar and cut a notch at the marks just drawn. Then place the antenna in the notch, and using a felt tip pen, mark the position of the top of the turtledeck on the antenna. Remove the antenna and cut the covering off the antenna just below this line. Then install the antenna using medium CA or 6 minute epoxy. Use rubbing alchohol to remove the felt tip pen marks and any excess adhesive.

Product Support

Technical questions about this Hangar 9 product should be directed to Horizon Hobby's Product Support Department:

Sales Support

If you would like to purchase this product, please go to the Store Locator or contact the Horizon Hobby Consumer Sales Department:

Horizon Hobby, LLC.
ATTN: Consumer Sales

2904 Research Road
Champaign, IL 61822
Email: Sales Phone:(800) 338-4639
Fax:(217) 355-1552